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Food

Food

  • April 9, 2013
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  • by Keeb

Interlocutor 1
Instinctively when we are in touch with our inner selves we will eat the things that we require. I agree with Renee Whitelaw that we eat according to our emotional state. There are certain foods we gravitate towards depending on where our mind/emotions are, the frequency of those foods match the frequency of our vibration state. Anyone who is asking others to live or eat a certain way needs to understand this. And for those who wonder where veggies and vegans get protein from … look at the charts, protein is not just present in meat.

Interlocutor 2
There are parasites in our gut that send signals to our brains to make us crave foods that make our systems acidic in order for the parasite to thrive… the foods we crave (for someone with an acidic ph) are not necessarily being craved by us … as crazy as that sounds. Once you stabilise your ph above 7 the parasites die and the cravings can then be trusted.

A cow has more than one stomach. One of the cow’s stomachs is called a rumen (hence the name ruminant for hoofed animals with rumens and hence the word ruminate since the food sits in the rumen for a while as it ferments). In the rumen, special bacteria ferment the vegetable protein (amino acids) and convert it into proteins that are usable by animals.

Interlocutor 1

Indeed that is so. I make my assertion for those that crave meat mostly, just to prove that it is just that, a craving.

Keeb
Whitelaw’s theory holds some weight from a psychological standpoint, the bio-energetic frequency standpoint is not so clear. Also neurotic vegans are actually quite common.

Interlocutor 2

Our thoughts and externally/internally created stress create emotion and neurotic reactions. The food we consume is only a single part of the factors. You could debate that how you feel about what you eat is as important as what you eat.

Interlocutor 1

Well I am not neurotic yet, but maybe it takes time! Feel sure that the poison that is pumped into meat could cause much more than neurosis. One can get all nutrients from a plant based diet, as long as one takes B12 supplements. How we choose, handle and feel about food is so much part of the wellbeing process of food being medicine.

Interlocutor 2
I agree.

Keeb
Paracelsus once said, ‘Food for some, poison for others.’ What is clear is that a body-mind that is in touch with itself will eat close to what is our natural ancestral forest dwelling diet, which is predominantly frugivore (90%) with other supplements like nuts, flowers, seeds, raw fish and meats, etc. The signification is one way, meaning that someone who is truly clear will eat close to this frugivore / vegan / raw mix but that does not automatically imply a person who is frugivore or vegan is necessarily clear. The latter is often blurred by psychological ideals.

A person who is bio-energetically radiant feels the heaviness of a steak or a plate of pasta more noticeably that someone who is not radiant. However what someone eats does not signify a person’s bio-energy exclusively. Tantric masters often eat meat, so it does not always follow in a clear cut way. That was my point from earlier.

Interlocutor 2

So if someone is bio-energetically radiant they are more aware of the vibration on the plate? You would instinctively presume that it would be magnetic energy that would deliver the vibration of your potential food? Ultimately is a healthy bio-energetic system not equally functional radiantly and magnetically? This is the first connection I have heard connecting the light body and physical… have you a source you can recommend for me to have a look into it? And thanks for bringing this info to my attention.

Keeb

What I mean is that they are more aware of what a t-bone steak does to them, a kinaesthetic dissonance is felt in the body after eating rather than before when it is on the plate. A posteriori knowledge is carried over into the next experience a t-bone is served up to them. No magic rays from the plate into the mind, nor any mentions of light bodies.

Interlocutor 2
Ah so it’s not the vibration of the food on the plate but memory of experience…

Keeb
Actually it is both, the vibration of the food on the plate determines experience and thus the knowledge we carry over. The real factor is the chi level of the food. As soon as you cook it you destroy it – vegan recipe or veggie or whatever. One must look at nature and animals and early humans. Raw is always best – fruit, veg, berries, nuts and yes even fish and meat on occasion. Raw fish is infinitely better than cooked vegan. That’s the key point. And obviously eat wild food not factory food. Factory meat carries trauma from the torture of animals and humans absorb that daily. It becomes intuitive and natural.

Interlocutor 2

Eating raw will mean the hydration of the food is natural and have a positive effect on digestion amongst other factors….yes, I can see the truth in what you are saying.

Keeb
Natural wild foods contains within them the enzymes for digestion, as soon as you cook food you destroy them, therefore the body uses more energy manufacturing replacement enzymes. Also there is a much greater chance that the body will treat the food as a foreign body and subsequently attack it. This often results in the non-absorption of key nutrients and there are often side effects like inflammation, bloating, unwanted hormone releases and so on.

Also the quantity of raw food required is about half that of cooked food. Put two equal plates together of standard portion and you wouldn’t be able to finish the raw plate whereas you would the cooked plate. Test it yourself. Eating raw the quantity consumed drops significantly. We worry about global food supply yet we are ubiquitously over-eating. Inventions of modernity like pesticides, hormones, GMO also create a host of health problems for the consumer, all justified in the name of increasing global food supply. I question this perverse ideology. It makes no sense at all.

3 meals a day should also be dropped … one should graze lightly across the day; this is how we are supposed to eat… though often impractical in today’s world, with the slavery that is work which consumes so much of the day.

Left in the dark is an excellent book relating neuro-endocrine hormones with the foods we eat and how it affects behaviour.
Left in the Dark

One final point. Our emotional state as important as the food we eat. Too much raw in the dead of winter is tough going and overly devout. So eat hot soups and traditional winter food as treats and pick me ups. The trick is to not live in conflict according to any food ideals.

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